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Trekking beneath Manaslu

/ Mountain News

spent the two days of rest in the base camp not only on lounging about and preparing gear. I decided to use this extra free time to tell you what the hike to Manaslu actually looks like. Trekking can be recommended to anyone who wants to see the Himalayan peaks, stand at their feet and look at them from various perspectives – not necessarily with an ambition to climb them or ski them down, like us.

foto: Marcin Kin/andrzejbargiel.com

One of the assumptions of the Hic Sunt Leones project is getting to know not only the mountains but also the people that live there, their cultures and the traditions that they represent. Shishapangma became the goal of our last year’s expedition because we wanted to climb it, as well as because it is the only mountain over 8,000 m high located in Tibet, which I longed to explore. For the same reason, before reaching the Shishapangma base camp, we went to acclimatise in the region of mountain Kailash, visited by many pilgrims.

foto: Marcin Kin/andrzejbargiel.com

I first got to the foot of Manaslu in 2012 during a unification expedition of the Polish Winter Himalaism 2010-2015 programme. This year I can see the changes that took place here in the past two and a half years.

foto: Marcin Kin/andrzejbargiel.com

I first got to the foot of Manaslu in 2012 during a unification expedition of the Polish Winter Himalaism 2010-2015 programme. This year I can see the changes that took place here in the past two and a half years.

foto: Marcin Kin/andrzejbargiel.com

On the way to the base camp our team covered only a part of the trekking route. It can be continued further round Manaslu. It is a trail for ambitious hikers who want to see a bit of the wild Himalayas that can no longer be found on the popular routes to the Annapurna Sanctuary or around that peak, much less in the Khumbu region, e.g. along the Everest Trek which I completed two years ago during the Lhotse expedition. Crowds of tourists, craving to see the most famous mountains in the world, accompany the numerous expeditions (much more numerous than those at the foot of Manaslu) that head to Everest or Lhotse, but also to the lower but equally popular summits, such as the easy Island Peak or the more difficult Ama Dablam. In October it gets really crowded there – almost like during the summer in the Tatra Mountains!

foto: Marcin Kin/andrzejbargiel.com

The trek offers a view on Manaslu but also on Himalchuli and Peak 29 – both just under 8,000 m, lower but difficult to climb. The latter was first climbed in 1979 by our older colleagues from Zakopane – Ryszard Gajewski and Maciej Pawlikowski. It was a huge success then.

foto: Marcin Kin/andrzejbargiel.com

Further along the trail, the Ganesh Himal group looms into view. In the middle of the route that circles Manaslu we headed to the base camp under the summit. However, the trek can be continued. It leads through the Larkya La Pass (5,213 m) and the river bed of Dudh Kola, which then flows into the Marsyandi River. At that point, the route of the trail around Manaslu meets the route that circles Annapurna. But this is a totally different mountain and a different story…

foto: Marcin Kin/andrzejbargiel.com

The trails were described in detail by Janusz Kurczab, a famous Polish Himalayan climber and the leader of many expeditions, in his guide Himalaje Nepalu (The Nepal Himalaya). Maybe someone who plans to visit Nepal will choose the Manaslu Trek? I sincerely recommend it. :)

foto: Marcin Kin/andrzejbargiel.com

 Source: andrzejbargiel.com

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